Education


 Here’s what happened in Mutiny this week.

Jo started off the week with the tragic news of Laurie Baker’s death. He also blogged about how Google played an April Fool prank and the ABCs of audio/music blogging
 
Nita wrote about some students who have moderate views on reservations. She is concerned that couples can no longer enjoy sunsets on sea fronts without looking over their shoulders and is worried about wild Life in India which is under grave threat
 
Swetha takes a sneak peek at Sivaji – Rajnikant’s Next Blockbuster
 
Jerry blogged prolifically about Eragon, Mid-Night Hot and The New Detectives  CPM. He rants about why the M6A1 is being deployed overseas.
 
Guru tells us about Network Computers and provided some very informative links in HowTo: Startups
 
Chacko writes about  a league for cricket and  gives his opinion on the BJP. He also shows us a very  interesting piece of Indian art in a restaurant in Smash Menu.
 
Cakerfare informs us about ATM Access in Bihar
 
Maltesh writes about Logan and opines that we should not give a reservation to folks who don’t want to stay in India
 
Gentledude writes about the ubiquitous hand pump
 
Sridhar ended the week informing us that Musharraf is deliberately letting Talibanization creep into main cities
 
 Keep coming back for more at the Mutiny !
 
 

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😉 Guys !!! Take your eyes of them and tell me what brought these ‘awesome’ pics appear in a daily. Your options are (a) because they are Victoria Secret Models (b)Models from Milan Fashion Week (c) I dont care what it is, i just want to keep staring at them.

Then here is the next one …

WOW Celina Jaitly… Ohhh… What brought this photo of this bomb-shell in the papers? Options (a)Kingfisher Calender 2008 (b)She donated her clothes to the poor (c)(I see the leopard skin)She is protesting like Rakhi Sawanth against animal cruelties (d)I don’t give a damn, i just want to drool…

🙂 gotcha .. The answer is no where in the options. If u seriously burnt your brains over it, don’t blame me. Blame the reporter who put these pics in his article, blame the editor approved these contents in the paper and the least blame me for putting it here. If it was not for the pic i wouldn’t have read these articles in the first place… ( 🙂 ya thats a confession i make).

The first two models in lingerie came as the photos for an article reporting the apparent ban of FTV by the government.Now the funniest part, the second photo was for the article on Celina Jaitly’s apparent comment that “The more you dress, the more sexier you look”… 😆

Now to the real matter, FTV is banned for 2 months for beaming objectionable content programs

The official Report said : The channel has been banned for showing programmes that were against good taste and decency, denigrate women and likely to adversely effect public morality, it said.

How sad!!! Many people are going to be heart broken. What the hell. The banned a TV channel for airing such a program. Then what about this paper that have these fotos in a daily basis. This appeared in the Bangalore Times supplement of the famous Times of India news paper.The funniest thing is that Bangalore is a place where ‘Night-Life’ like pubs, discos and parties are banned after 10PM (if u call that as night life) by the police.

So the print media has the authority to print anything. If its the morale of the society that the ‘government’ is planning to protect, then this is not the way to deal things.

How many schools offer proper sex education? How many youngsters have the liberty of having an open conversation with their parents on these matters? In how many homes speaking or mentioning of sex is still a taboo? Ya they might argue that they give their kids the liberty, the freedom to have a drink with them at times. But that is what you shouldn’t encourage and teach them about much important things. At least teach them to be responsible citizens, the crime rate may come down.

So for the time being guys don’t loose heart, Mid-night Hot and Too Hot at 2 will be back after 2 months. Till then read the daily edition Bangalore Times of Times of India.

(cross posted here)

At Mutiny, Polite Indian has covered the Supreme court verdict on the reservation issue comprehensively. I have been following other news on this too, specifically television programmes which aired the opinions of young students on this issue. It is interesting to note that some students who are anti-reservation are not against reservation per se. A programme on CNN IBN for example shows one student (in the anti reservationist group) saying that he doesn’t mind reservations, but for gods sake let their be a time line! Say 50 years. Another student, again from the same group, is against the creamy layer getting reservations. Another says that he wants the percentage of the quota to be reduced. I have watched other programmes too, on Times Now for example and here it is a similar story. A lot of heartburn on the creamy layer being entitled to reservations. Some insisted on reservations in elite primary schools, not higher education.

I emphathise with the moderates, although they are not called moderates. They are clubbed under anti reservationists.

I had written about the Supreme Court staying the OBC quotas on my personal blog, and had gone a step further saying that not only should the creamy layer be excluded, but people from all religions be brought under its fold. That is a very controversial opinion I realised after I got a comment about how easy it is for Brahmins to talk like this. I couldn’t quite understand that comment because I simply cannot think in terms of caste however hard I try. My identity is not Brahmin, its Indian, and to some extent – regional (Maharastrian). I think this is a lot to do with the fact that I studied in St. Mary’s school, Pune, and half the class were Christians, several Muslims and Parsees, Jains, and in fact the Hindus were in a minority. I was never conscious that I was a Brahmin and I guess that has remained with me throughout my life.

Today I feel that the disadvantaged, whatever the community they come from, should get reservations. No, I am not for reserving such a great number of seats, and I am not sure whether it is a good thing to have reservations in higher educational institutions, but I can be convinced. Also, I feel the modalities can be worked out better and there should be transparency… right now there is a belief (probably erroneous) that even those with 50 per cent marks can get into a higher educational institutions.

The good thing about the Supreme Court judgement is that everything will now come out in the open (hopefully). The main question as to who the reservations are for, should be answered satisfactorily.

And let us never forget the reasons why the non-Hindu disadvantaged are where they are today. Many of those who converted (how I hate writing this, in case someone misunderstands!) were not Brahmins.

weekly wrapup
Another lovely week went away with mutiny picking on hits and getting more hits and then picking a little more.

Chacko wondered what happened to CNN IBN’S website earlier this week. He usually is very very inquisitive, isnt it? Later in the week he goes all crazy, he wants a CSI team for Jamaica led by two Malayalees. Chacko punks.

Angelspace digs a beautiful ad that pleads, “Don’t burn the planet away“. Later this week she’s got a beautiful caricature about the Indian cricket performance.

Guru comes up with another interesting story about how classical music and modern gadgetry are shaping up. Later in the week he provides a bit of history of Indian constitution.

Polite takes a look at the recent UN Slam on India on Dalit Violence. He believes this was coming.

Jo covers the online grievance Forum and how a folk got himself heard and got the BSNL show caused. Later in the week he debates if Mohan Lal is at fault for selling liquor.

Out fastrack expert Maltesh writes about the much talked about F1 track on Rajpath.

HinduMommy comes up with her popular top something things, this time its top 21 things Indians say when they return to India from US. Damn good it is.

GentleDude revisits the Babri Saga. Its a very personal description. Good work Dude.

Towards the end of the week, Jo comes up with his thoughts on conversion and religion.

Polite Indian covers the news of the week – SC stay in OBC.

Guru at the end of the week tells us about how some time back, employment with Govt of India was an honor.

Ujj ends the week with this chotu post on the Globalized Vadapao. The man can eat.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
It was another eventful week in Mutiny, and here is a categorized summary!

  1. Music: Jo began the week with some cool news about the availability of teasers from BlogSwara and followed it up later with the news of the launch of the site.
  2. Science: Cakerfare discussed the idea behind genetically modified malaria resistant mosquitoes in tackling malaria, while Vishal followed the story of the discovery of 3.8 million year old rocks and the relevance of the discovery to geological theories of plate tectonics.
  3. Cricket: While Chacko was optimistic about the chances of the Indian team and did some number juggling, later in the week, Sridhar Kondoji felt that the products endorsed by Indian cricketers need to be boycotted as a mark of protest against the abysmal performance of the team India.
  4. Pseudo-religion: Gentledude admonished Indians for their blind faith in godmen with specific reference to Baba, and followed it by another post on the paradox of Lord Balaji being the second richest god in the world, while half of India is languishing below poverty line.
  5. Education: Polite Indian wonders if corporate punishement is needed at all, and concludes in the negative.
  6. Society: While Nita wrote for the need of sensitivity on the part of all of us in the wake of Sikh community taking exceptions to Sardar jokes, Guru pointed to Andre Beteille’s article which argued caste to be an Indian socio-economic institution.
  7. Justice: SwethaIyer’s confidence in the Indian judicial system is reinforced after the verdict of guilty for the accused in the killing of Manjunath Shanmugam.
  8. Management: Vishal, while narrowing down on the reasons for the dumb decisions that managers make, also identifies five signs that indicate trouble in an organization.
  9. News and Media: While Guru laments the dearth of “real” news, Nita finds that the marriage of Liz and Arun Nair is still the hot selling item on the streets.
  10. Tips: While Jo tips us about the free phone call service Fone Mine, Sridhar Kondoji tells you what to do when the markets are down.
  11. Issues: Guru felt that the Mashelkar committee should be terminated, and (in a follow-up post on brain drain) indicated that brain drain is not that bad after all; and, Jo dedicated a song to the victims of Nandigram.
  12. Interview: Ujj interviewed Vinod George Joseph, the author of Hitchhiker (shortly after his review of the book).

Hope you enjoyed reading mutiny and voicing your opinions on issues as much as we enjoyed our writing and hearing from you.

Hope to see you in these parts of the blogosphere soon, again!

I have always wondered why is it necessary to award corporal punishment to school kids? So far I haven’t found an answer. This particular incident once again got me thinking.

Ujjwala Andrews, a teacher in city’s Vinay High School, will serve one year of simple imprisonment for causing the grievous injury to Munir Patel 11 years ago.

Patel’s fault was that he was “troubling his teachers”.

After being hit on head with a wooden scale, the boy began to get seizures and was hospitalised for serious head injury.

This has taken 11 years out of Munir’s life and he had to drop out from school.

Patel, now 27, dropped out of school after the incident and works in a shop now.

He said Andrews deserved “stringent punishment”. “The beating I received at her hands has changed the course of my life. She has got away with a lighter sentence. You tell me how would you have felt if this happened with you?” he was quoted as saying by PTI.

Can you imagine someone’s life being changed in such a way? Munir’s example is one such case but there are so many cases where kids get affected in many different ways after receiving corporal punishments. Some have long lasting psychological impacts. Some just lose interest and some just drop out. Worst, some even commit suicide.

In India and many countries it is Okay to hit a school kids in order to discipline them. I think this needs to change. Corporal punishment should be banned in schools. There is really no need for it. It is heartening to see that some states have banned it. Delhi, Goa and TamilNadu are such states. Other states should follow suit. The teachers who lack the ability to teach, in my view, use such tactics to “discipline” children.

On the same lines I also think there is no need to hit a kid at home in order to discipline him.

 

cross posted here.

 

update: Another teacher gets sentenced. This one paraded the kid naked for taking a dip in the school tank. I hope more parents and kids file complaints against such teachers. The only sad thing is that such cases are taking 10 years to adjucate. Why?

According to wikipedia,

A brain drain or human capital flight is an emigration of trained and talented individuals (“human capital“) to other nations or jurisdictions, due to conflicts, lack of opportunity, or health hazards where they are living.

And, as is clear from this definition, brain drain is a word with a bad connotation. So, it is no wonder that we hear our politicians, statesmen and intellectuals often mourning brain drain.

For example, here is the President of India, Dr. Abdul Kalam on reversing brain drain:

President A P J Abdul Kalam today announced the government would encourage a ”reverse brain drain” to attract some of the brightest and talented children of India and ensure their return to their motherland.

Addressing a joint sitting of Parliament, he appealed to the overseas Indians to engage more actively in India’s development.

The latest issue of Nature brings some good news; in an editorial titled In praise of the “brain drain”,  there are some interesting observations:

There is a clear correlation between emigration and the state of the public health care system, but not the one you might expect. The higher the proportion of an African nation’s nurses and doctors who have moved abroad, the better shape its health care is likely to be in.

These observations are based on a report which is available here. So, the article concludes on a positive note, namely that emigration is a not a zero sum game — very encouraging news indeed!

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