At Mutiny, Polite Indian has covered the Supreme court verdict on the reservation issue comprehensively. I have been following other news on this too, specifically television programmes which aired the opinions of young students on this issue. It is interesting to note that some students who are anti-reservation are not against reservation per se. A programme on CNN IBN for example shows one student (in the anti reservationist group) saying that he doesn’t mind reservations, but for gods sake let their be a time line! Say 50 years. Another student, again from the same group, is against the creamy layer getting reservations. Another says that he wants the percentage of the quota to be reduced. I have watched other programmes too, on Times Now for example and here it is a similar story. A lot of heartburn on the creamy layer being entitled to reservations. Some insisted on reservations in elite primary schools, not higher education.

I emphathise with the moderates, although they are not called moderates. They are clubbed under anti reservationists.

I had written about the Supreme Court staying the OBC quotas on my personal blog, and had gone a step further saying that not only should the creamy layer be excluded, but people from all religions be brought under its fold. That is a very controversial opinion I realised after I got a comment about how easy it is for Brahmins to talk like this. I couldn’t quite understand that comment because I simply cannot think in terms of caste however hard I try. My identity is not Brahmin, its Indian, and to some extent – regional (Maharastrian). I think this is a lot to do with the fact that I studied in St. Mary’s school, Pune, and half the class were Christians, several Muslims and Parsees, Jains, and in fact the Hindus were in a minority. I was never conscious that I was a Brahmin and I guess that has remained with me throughout my life.

Today I feel that the disadvantaged, whatever the community they come from, should get reservations. No, I am not for reserving such a great number of seats, and I am not sure whether it is a good thing to have reservations in higher educational institutions, but I can be convinced. Also, I feel the modalities can be worked out better and there should be transparency… right now there is a belief (probably erroneous) that even those with 50 per cent marks can get into a higher educational institutions.

The good thing about the Supreme Court judgement is that everything will now come out in the open (hopefully). The main question as to who the reservations are for, should be answered satisfactorily.

And let us never forget the reasons why the non-Hindu disadvantaged are where they are today. Many of those who converted (how I hate writing this, in case someone misunderstands!) were not Brahmins.